Anxiety vs Avoidance – As a parent how do I know I’ve got the balance right?

The burning question I always have as a mum is how do I know I’ve got it right?  How do I know my decision is the right one?

My daughter’s autism manifests in many ways but one of the main ways is anxiety.  She has enormous trouble decoding the world, processing the information and coping with change.

She can’t explain herself and self advocate when she is experiencing stress and it’s always with hindsight that the facts come out.  While she is experiencing stress she is in survival mode and doesn’t even recognise she is stressed until the stress stops.

This goes some way to explain how she holds it together at school and appears ‘fine’ and sometimes appears better than fine, she’ll be laughing and engaging but still comes home to fall apart.

This week has been so hard for her with staff illness and absence meaning unexpected substitute teachers.  Her week is not going to plan, it’s unfamiliar and the level of stress it causes impacts on everything.  She came home from school last night subdued and tense.  She was pale and clammy and being winter I suspected a bug, I took her temperature and it was normal.  She was not unwell, she is just exhausted and drained from the emotional toll of all the changes.  The evening was erratic, she was vacillating between tearful and angry, she was refusing school the next day and  refused to go to ballet that evening.

I decided to allow her not to go to ballet this time.  I usually push her outside of her comfort zones and insist she sticks to her commitments.  It was her choice to take up ballet and she’s really good at it, she has just achieved a high merit in her exam and was really (rightly) proud of herself. This term every week she’s tried to get out of going to class and I’ve not caved once.  It’s exhausting always battling and cajoling but it’s the right thing to do and furthermore we’ve paid for it, so she’s going!  She can never explain why she doesn’t want to go and I can’t get to the bottom of it so, commit she must.

After all the school changes this week however I felt that rather than fight that battle I’d keep her home and let her rest and hopefully increase the chance of her managing school the next day.

All evening her stomach was churning with anxiety about the following day at school.  A totally new teacher she has never met is taking them and this is all too new.  There are too many unknowns that haven’t been planned, prepared and practised.  It’s overwhelming for her.

She woke up this morning claiming illness.  It’s really avoidance.

My main aim is to get her to

  1. Correctly identify what she is feeling
  2. Correctly describe/label what she is feeling/experiencing

We have spent a lot of time talking about ‘the little boy who cried wolf’ over the years, we’ve read the book more times than I can count.  On an academic level she understands the concept but she is not equipped to manage putting it into practice.  So every time she experiences anxiety she claims illness.

She is eight years old.  Now is my time to teach her to recognise what her body is telling her.  To teach her how to self advocate for that.  To teach her that she will be believed when she says she is  feeling anxious and that it’s nothing to be ‘embarrassed’ about [her words].  It’s our chance to prove to her that she will be respected for the recognising her feelings and limits.  It’s our chance to nurture her, to build her into a strong person who can identify and manage her body’s signals.

We also have to be careful not to be manipulated every time she wants to get out of doing something for any reason other than her crippling anxiety.  She’s very bright, she’d make the connection and employ the tactic if she felt it would work.

So, as a mum, how do I know when to push her and when to nurture her?

Mental ill health in young people is on the rise.  The amount of pressure our children are under is at an all-time high and is in some cases damaging their psyches.  The amount of help available is minimal as the NHS mental health service is at crisis point.  Prevention is better than cure, especially when ‘cure’ relies on patchy service availability.

Autistic girls are a particularly vulnerable group and I’m very conscious of that.

Am I harming her or helping her by pushing her out of her comfort zone, by making her go to school?

What is the right answer?

I’m so proud of her, that today, with my and the school’s help she managed to go in.  I managed to tread the fine line of ‘coaxing without demanding’ well enough to get her to school and then with their help through the door, they are managing her transition into and through this tricky day.

Are they doing it right? None of us truly know.  Are they doing their best? Absolutely.

Am I worried that my daughter is suppressing her anxiety to meet expectations? Yes, very.

Do I feel conflicted about this? Yes, incredibly so.

Suppressing her anxiety is different from coping with it.  Suppressing it is quashing it, ignoring it and denying it which leaves it simmering deep down causing damage and delayed presentation.  Coping means addressing it, solving it, learning from it and leaving it behind.  It’s a fine line to find the balance.  How do I know I’m getting it right?

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